Amish Chicken

IMG_3527So, what exactly is Amish Chicken? An organic chicken raised by the Amish? Amish do not believe in hormones or steroids, so I assume it is organic. I am using the term Amish not for the chicken, although I am using an organic chicken, but rather for the way it is being cooked. Which if I’m being honest is probably the same way your grandma made it.

I could just as easily call it old-fashion chicken, but it just doesn’t capture your attention as much as Amish. Admit it, you were intrigued.  Either way, I promise you will not be disappointed in the seasonings that go into this recipe. It bakes up golden and delicious and I am serving it with barley in a chicken au gravy.

The Chicken:

The success of this chicken is in the way it is cooked. I’ll fry it first to give it a nice golden coat and finish cooking it in the oven, so the skin does not get overcooked. Start by salt and peppering 4 leg quarters. In a shallow bowl or pan mix together 1 cup flour, 2 teaspoons garlic powder, 1 tablespoon TWS smoked sea salt, 1 teaspoon pepper, and 2 teaspoons paprika. In a second shallow bowl or pan add 1½ cups buttermilk. Dip the leg quarters in the milk covering thoroughly. Dredge through the flour mixture shaking off any excess flour.

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Heat 1” vegetable oil in a heavy pot until hot, 325°F. Fry the chicken working in batches just until the skin is golden brown. Transfer the fried chicken to a baking pan. I like to use my copper air fryer pan. I place the chicken on the rack and cover with foil to keep the skin from burning or turning too dark. When all the chicken has been fried, place in a preheated 350°F oven and bake for 1 hour.

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The Barley:

Meanwhile, in a medium saucepan combine 1 cup pearl barley with 3 cups water. Season with some salt, to taste. Bring to a boil over high heat. When the barley comes to a boil, lower the heat to a low simmer, cover and continue to cook for 25 minutes. Remove from heat and let sit for 10 minutes, covered, until all the water has been absorbed.

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In a medium saucepan add 1 cup chicken broth and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to low: whisk in 1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce, 1/4 teaspoon garlic powder, and salt & pepper, to taste.  Let simmer until reduced to about half. The longer it reduces down the more gravy-like it becomes.

Assemble:

Ladle some of the chicken au gravy over a serving plate. Fluff the barley with a fork and spoon into the center of the plate. Place a piece of chicken on top and serve immediately.

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This is my favorite way to prepare chicken because it keeps it crispy and crunchy on the outside and juicy and delicious on the inside. I hope you like it! – Ella💙

Amish Chicken
Prep Time
15 mins
Cook Time
1 hr
Total Time
1 hr 15 mins
 
Course: Main Course
Cuisine: American
Keyword: fried chicken, grains
Servings: 6 servings
Author: Ella @ thewackyspoon.com
Ingredients
  • 4 chicken leg quarters
  • 1 cup flour
  • 2 teaspoons garlic powder
  • 1 tablespoon TWS smoked salt
  • 1 teaspoon pepper
  • 2 teaspoons paprika
  • cups buttermilk
  • 1/4 cup vegetable oil
  • 1 cup pearl barley
  • 3 cups water
  • Salt, to taste
  • 1 cup chicken broth
  • 1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce
  • 1/4 teaspoon garlic powder
  • Salt and pepper, to taste
Instructions
  1. Mix the flour, garlic powder, salt, pepper, and paprika. Dredge the chicken pieces in the buttermilk followed by the flour mixture shaking off any excess flour.
  2. Heat the oil in a heavy pot until hot, 325°F. Fry the chicken working in batches just until the skin is golden brown. Transfer the chicken to a baking pan.
  3. When all the chicken has been fried and placed in the baking pan place in oven and bake at 350°F for 1 hour.
  4. Meanwhile, combine the barley and water in a medium saucepan. Add some salt, to taste. Bring to a boil over high heat.
  5. When the barley comes to a boil, lower the heat to a low simmer, cover and continue to cook for 25 minutes. Remove from heat and let sit for 10 minutes, covered, until all the water has been absorbed.
  6. Place the chicken broth in a medium saucepan and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to low: whisk in the Worcestershire sauce, garlic powder, salt, and pepper. Let simmer until reduced to about half. Serve immediately.
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Author: Ella

Just a girl who loves to cook farm-to-fork foods living the dream!

13 thoughts

  1. Yep, you’re right. The title grabbed me.

    I used to have Amish neighbors, and was invited to dinner on occasion. They eat very big meals, but here’s the thing . . they work hard! And none of the food they served was processed. All of it was made from scratch, all of it. There’s something to be said for that old school mentality.

    1. What a great experience to have dine with your neighbor, Amish or English. Wouldn’t it be nice to do more of that? Especially reaching out to those we think of as different from us. It’s hard to hate after you broke bread with someone.

      I’m all about the non-processed from scratch cooking. It is something I embrace here on “The Wacky Spoon,” at the market, and on the farm!

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      1. You said it all right there chica.

        The Amish are fascinating in how they remain fastened to a history. They have adapted WAY more than people know, but the underpinnings remain in place. It’s commendable. And the Amish call us folk “English”, lol.

        There is so much to be said for that. Look at generations past. They ate BIG meals but there were no concerns as far as weight, because they were highly active and they made real food.

        You are old school Ella!

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